Flipping the Script on Holiday Drama

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Although on Facebook, social media, and in movies I see the act of gratitude and a display on intense and meaningful family love, I rarely experience this in real life or hear about it from my clients.  The holidays can be fun or uneventful, but more often than not feelings that have been lingering under the rug for years can be brought to the surface with one passive aggressive comment or judging attitude.  Even if it’s not super dramatic, most people seem to have difficulty finding and practicing gratitude after holiday get togethers and family time. 

 

How much of this is because of our attitude going into the event?  I think we tend to set ourselves up to experience drama or ill feelings towards a family member by thinking too much about it or getting mentally ready days before the event.  We create a self fulfilling prophecy by making predictions about what will happen and how terrible it will be.  Then it doesn’t really matter what mom’s attitude is or how dad asks a question, we read it as negative and respond negatively back.  It really is important to go into situations with as few expectations as possible to prevent yourself from either seeing everything through a negative lens or setting yourself up for disappointment. 

 

Sometimes it won’t matter how positive you are or how strong your boundaries are, how compassionately you communicate or how clear you assert yourself – there will still be sensitivities and discomfort at times with family.  Think about what you can control versus what’s out of your control.  You can’t control distasteful questions or judgy eyes staring you down, but you can control your response and how you communicate a boundary around asking such questions or your feelings about being judged.  And when you’ve done everything you can do, it still may not be enough to break through to your family or get the respect you’ve been waiting for.  In those moments, all you can do is sit with the discomfort and flip the script. 

 

Flipping the script is thinking about what you are able to gain from these experiences and how it can help you become a better person.  For example, maybe you didn’t realize there was a sensitivity or shame attached to a certain issue, and your aunts invasive questions have allowed that feeling to be brought to the surface so now you can face it and learn to deal with it.  That’s something to be grateful for even though it’s difficult in that moment.  Maybe solidifying the idea that certain relationships will not change and you can now label them as toxic and work to get them out of your life.  It could be that you’ve gained insights as to why you are the way you are, or you have opportunities to practice empathy and compassion (or self-compassion).  If you allow it and are open to flipping the script, any interaction or moment no matter how horrible it feels at the time can become meaningful or helpful, and that is something to be extra grateful for. 

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If you are looking for someone to help you understand yourself better, help with conflict resolution with your partner, or need a listening ear in regards to infertility, postpartum depression and anxiety, new parenthood, or perfectionism, please know I am here for you.  My practice is located in League City, Tx and I offer couples therapy, individual therapy, and online therapy.  Call me for a free 15 minute phone consultation at (832) 827-3288 so we can talk more about how therapy works and determine if we are a good fit. 

Transparent but Vague: A Mantra to Get You Through the Holidays

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As the holidays approach, I can hear and feel the anxiety levels rising in my clients, friends, and family.  The holidays can be a time for gratitude, family gatherings, parties, and my personal favorite, lots of good food.  But the holidays are also a triggering time of the year for a lot of people.  And the main thing I tend to hear about from my clients are those well-meaning, personal, cringe worthy questions that everyone in the family seems to bust out right before dinner. 

 With my specialty in infertility counseling, I hear about so many uncomfortable and unpleasant situations that start with questions about when they are having kids and why it hasn’t happened yet, and worst of all whose fault it is.  But honestly, I hear these stories from almost every single one of my clients, those going through divorce, couples having relationship struggles, new parents who are just happy to have showered today, people dealing with chronic illness, anyone going through something difficult and painful (so isn’t that everyone really?).  I often spend a few sessions preparing clients for holiday events and encourage my couples to come up with a code or agreed upon phrase that will signal to their partner they need extra support to get through an overwhelming situation.  Notice I didn’t say to avoid, escape, sugarcoat, or lie, which I’ve noticed people tend to do. 

 Why Do These Questions Bother You?

I also think it’s important to ask yourself why these questions are bothersome, and why we have the desire to avoid them.  I’ve been there myself too, frozen or immediately anxiety ridden when that hard question comes at me and I don’t know how to answer it.  It’s pretty easy to put the blame on the question asker, because how dare they ask such an insensitive and invasive question?  In reality, there’s probably some truth to the idea that the other person isn’t aware of your pain, doesn’t have good boundaries, doesn’t care about your feelings, or is completely aloof.  I think it’s imperative at that moment, you shift the focus from why or what the question is to yourself and what’s going on for you.  Try to lean into the pain that comes up, because it can be very damaging to you if you don’t.

 Typically, the difficult questions are asked, we aren’t ready to talk about it, we feel anxious, and we shut down the conversation by saying “everything’s fine”, avoiding the question, changing the subject, or flat out lying.  These can be effective strategies…in the short term.  But when we do this, we shut down any opportunity to be vulnerable with ourselves and others, and we’ve begun the process of burying our emotions and building up guards to protect ourselves.  This process can have major effects down the road, or even 30 minutes later if someone says the wrong thing at dinner and there’s an explosion or misplaced anger (this one happened to me, I’ll write about that another time). 

 Transparency and Honesty

What I’ve found helps clients the most is preparing for going into these events and having an understanding of what questions may be asked, and then thinking about how to respond using my mantra “Transparent but Vague”.  Don’t bury or avoid or sugarcoat because that’s not being clear or honest with yourself and enhances and feeds uncomfortable emotions such as guilt and shame.  Instead find ways to be transparent and forthcoming about how you’re feeling.  For example, if you’re undergoing infertility treatments, it’s ok to say you’re having difficulty getting pregnant or you’re struggling with how hard the process has been.  If you’re having relationship troubles you can be honest that things have been rough and you’re working hard to repair the relationship.  You can say you’re having trouble figuring out how to take care of yourself and that you’ve trying to focus on discovering what you need and that’s why you’ve pulled back, but that you appreciate the support.  I hope you’ll notice that these examples are very simple, short, and really to the point of your pain instead of long, drawn out, and beating around the bush of what’s actually going on.

 Vagueness

So here comes the “vague” part.  You don’t have to, nor do you need to in my opinion, give everyone all the nitty gritty details of what you’re going through at Thanksgiving dinner or a Christmas cocktail party.  Spending time and energy describing every appointment, all the medical treatments, every divorce proceeding, or detailing a fight you had yesterday is not going to put you in the best place, it’s not setting up the other person for success in providing support, and you’re at risk to be misunderstood and not validated.  When we feel like the other person doesn’t understand us or doesn’t give our emotions any consideration or value, it’s easy to put the blame on someone else and redirect all the feelings we don’t actually want to experience and place them on the person standing in front of us who is saying all the wrong things.  It’s truly a distraction from experiencing and processing our own feelings, again shutting down vulnerability and keeping you stuck. 

 You are not obligated to give details, and no one is entitled to knowing any information you’re not ready or willing to share.  You owe no explanation, you can voice a need, you do not have to engage right at that moment.  I’m not saying to never have in depth conversations or dive deeply into these issues, sometimes we need to vent and go through the details.  I’m just saying Thanksgiving dinner with your aunt may not be the best place and time to do that and preparing for that and using this mantra can help you get through these anxiety provoking situations easier. 

 So What Does it Look Like?

“It’s been more difficult than we expected to get pregnant and that’s been hard on us, but we’re starting the process to figure things out.”  Transparent but vague.

 “There’s been unexpected struggles since I got divorced and I don’t always know how to deal with it, but I’m working on reaching out to people for support when I need it.”  Transparent but vague.

 “We’ve been dealing with a lot lately and this is a difficult season in our marriage.  We’ve seen we have to learn to be more open with each other.”  Transparent but vague.

“I’m struggling with being a new mom.  I didn’t know it would be this hard.”  Transparent but vague.

 “I need help.  I’m not ready to talk about it right now, but I’d love to have lunch next week and tell you more about it then.”  Transparent but vague. 

 Be honest.  Be kind.  Be transparent.  Be vague.  It’s all ok, and you will be too. 

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If you’re struggling with relationship issues, conflict, infertility, postpartum depression/anxiety, becoming new parents, perfectionism, or not feeling good enough, I’m here to help.  I love working with clients not only to get through difficult moments in time, like the holidays, but to address all the underlying stuff that contributes to your pain.  I want to help you get past it so you can feel better and live a more meaningful life.  My office is located in League City and I also provide online therapy in the State of Texas.  Give me a call at (832) 827-3288 for a free 15 minute phone consultation to see if we’re a good fit. 

Aftermath of Hurricane Harvey: Coping Skills & Back to Basics

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In these initial weeks following Hurricane Harvey, many people are trying to figure out what our new normal will be.  Some are headed back to work, some are helping with clean up and recovery, some are still in the midst of dealing with their devastation.  I think most of us are left with the question, "what the hell do we do now?" 

From what I've heard, seen, and been involved with, people have jumped into problem solving, fixing, and helping mode.  Over the last week homes have been stripped, laundry done by the masses, donations made, and volunteer hours served.  Everyone has been doing what they could to help.  People with damage have been calling insurance companies, having cars picked up, finding places to stay, and picking up the pieces of their lives.  Slowly our city is returning somewhat to normal operations.  Most businesses are open and people are back at work talking about their experiences.  It's a lot to process. 

How do we move forward from such a traumatic event?  The good news is that most people - and I mean the vast majority - will recover from this disaster, even those directly affected.  People are inherently resilient and able to utilize their strengths and coping skills to get through such an event.  We know this to be true from research, and so I've been exploring the idea of getting back to basics.  Right now the best way to help yourself and others move forward is to access simple ways to recover so you can reset your mind, body, and spirit.  

After all, this recovery process will take a long time.  We cannot expect that anyone could keep up this pace of triaged care and resources for the long haul.  I'm sure you've heard, it's a marathon and not a sprint, so we need to train and prep now for the journey we're going on.  

So what does back to basics practically look like? 

Sleeping 6.5-8 hours a night

Watch my video here that discusses why you've been experiencing sleep disturbance in the last couple of weeks and maybe for the next few weeks.  It's fascinating stuff and there are some good tips to get you back into regular sleep patterns so your brain and body can reset.  

Drink lots of water 

We need to flush out our stress hormones and chemicals that have backed up in our system from the last couple of weeks, and replenish our organs back to optimal functioning.  Being in survival mode for so many days takes a toll on the nervous system.  

Eating Healthy Foods

I think you get where this is going...restoring our bodies and brains to the best possible condition and functioning will reset everything. 

Daily exercise or movement 

Yes, again, to get the stress chemicals out of the body but also to bring about more balance.  Many people got stuck inside their homes and experienced a higher than normal amount of worrying and anxiety lately.  This takes place in the thinking part of our brain, and you can alleviate some of those symptoms by activating the moving part of the brain, allowing the different parts of the brain to have balance and work together giving you access to more of your coping skills.  Cool huh? 

Avoid caffeine, chocolate, nicotine, and alcohol

These substances all create a boost those chemicals that are keeping your body in overdrive.  I know you think they're helping, but they're actually prolonging your sleep and appetite disturbance.  

Engage in a Familiar Routine

This will help your body know what to anticipate and prepare your organs and brain for the activity you are going to complete.  Did you know if you go to the gym at the same time on specific days that your body starts to produce enzymes and chemicals that prepare the body and enhance your work out?  Same concept here as your mind and body are recovering.  

Give yourself some time

Remember that most people will return to normal functioning in a relatively short amount of time and that the reactions you are experiencing now are most likely normal.  Everyone experiences situations and reacts differently, and that's ok.  You don't need to worry if you experience it one way and your friend is having a different response.  The range of normal reactions is huge! The more you worry, the longer it will take to see the symptoms go away.  Give yourself time and permission to react however you are naturally, and be patient and mindful with what you need.  

For additional ideas, support, or to have a free 15-minute phone consult with me, call (832) 827-3288.  I'd love to hear from you and explore together how I can help. I'm a Marriage and Family Therapist in the Clear Lake area of Houston, Texas.  I offer couples therapy, individual counseling, online sessions, and in home support.  

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